Arnica Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy

Comprehensive health management

Massage therapy is widely recognized by patients and doctors as an effective means of treating soft tissue pain or disability.  It is defined as the manipulation of soft tissues and joints of the body for the treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction, or to relieve pain.  It is one of the oldest methods of healing, as the practice of therapeutic massage can be traced back nearly 4,000 years. Statistics from both Health Canada 1 and the American Massage Therapy Association 2 show that millions of North Americans use it today.

Massage therapists are trained in the principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology, massage theory and practical uses of massage techniques.  They are also versed in stretching techniques, remedial exercise and gentle mobilization.  Much training and practice are required to achieve the necessary skills and competence to work in the field of massage therapy.

The hands-on nature of massage therapy allows therapists the opportunity to spend more one-on-one time with their patients than many other health care professionals.  This gives you the time to relax, ask any questions that you may have, and to receive treatment.  Massage therapy is a wonderful way to find out more about what is happening in your body.  You will feel which muscles are tight or painful, explore ways of managing tension and learn how to take better care of yourself.

Massage is a holistic therapy that complements medical treatment. The "Physician's Guide to Therapeutic Massage" shows that massage can decrease pain, improve range of motion, improve mood, aid in the circulation of blood and lymph flow, reduce muscle and joint soreness, and improve sleep.

1 Health Canada (2003)Health Policy Research Bulletin. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iacb-dgiac/arad-draa/english/rmdd/bulletin/mainstream.html#page6
2 American Massage Therapy Association. (2001). Massage Therapy Consumer Fact Sheet